Sports Destination Management Magazine | Sports Destination Management

Sports Destination Management Magazine

2012

November/December 2012

Often, the things that it takes to put on a successful event are not just the things we see: the athletes, the spectators and the facilities. Sometimes, it goes beyond that. In this issue, we'll examine several things that might be largely invisible -- yet totally essential. The first is the value of a sports event to a community. We can talk about economic impact, but there's more to it than that. There's the civic pride, the morale boost that comes from a successful event and the ancillary benefit of spectators who become volunteers, and volunteers who become athletes.

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September/October 2012

Planning a sports event -- of any type -- demands a number of skills outside of an understanding of our chosen sport. We need to understand negotiations, budgeting, logistics and the intricacies of travel arrangements -- and that's just for starters. One of the great things about this industry the body of knowledge that surrounds us in the presence of our colleagues.

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July/August 2012

Athletes, in addition to being spokespersons, celebrities and more, have the sometimes difficult job of being role models. It's not always easy, but it can pay dividends by helping to instill good values in the generation coming up through the ranks. This month’s issue contains a great article on “Engaging the Community in Sports Events,” and I’m pleased to see an emphasis on the positive interaction between athletes and communities. Since our athletes may also be traveling abroad and competing in other countries at some point, it’s essential they be good role models there as well. The article on passports and visas can help organizations have the right paperwork ready when travel time comes.

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May/June 2012

This summer's Olympic Games in London will put a spotlight on the very best the sporting world has to offer. Athletes might win gold medals and glory, but for our industry, it translates into something a lot more valuable and lasting: increased participation. There is a positive correlation between extensive media coverage of the Olympics and people showing an interest in being more active and taking an interest in a given sport that year or the next. I'm pleased to see the insights this issue gives us into some of the sports the Olympics will offer.

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March/April 2012

As more and more individuals with mobility limitations take advantage of the recreation options available to them, the need to keep to have open, accessible events will keep on growing. Making your event not just friendly but downright welcoming to athletes and spectators with mobility limitations can mean an athlete not only returns next time, but brings family and friends. This issue's feature will provide some inside information from an industry expert who knows how to make that happen.

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January/February 2012

As the business of sports continues to evolve, sports themselves do as well. In this issue, we take a look at what is needed to provide great facilities for athletes with developmental challenges. Hint: It goes a lot deeper than just following ADA rules, and it applies to your event, no matter whether you're working with traditional competitive athletics or performance sports (like gymnastics or cheerleading).

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2011

November/December 2011

I'm a statistics geek. Give me some numbers and percentages and I'm all over it. And as the editor of a magazine that focuses on sports travel, it's even more fascinating when those numbers apply to your subject matter. That's why I was especially glad to see hard evidence that more kids than ever are playing high school sports. The best news of all? It's a trend that has been going strong for two decades now.

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September/October 2011

Everyone has a horror story. I'm not talking about the kind with the zombies and vampires. I'm talking about the kind that event planners, CVBs and others have dealt with. We all have them, and I'm guessing you've had one too. Maybe yours is about a pipe that burst and flooded the facility that was going to host your basketball tournament. Maybe it's about a school-system-wide flu epidemic that left you with a lot fewer athletes than you were counting on for your tournament. Maybe a big weather event closed the airport and left you unable to get to your tournament -- or maybe it's something else entirely that came out of left field and disrupted your well-laid plans.

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July/August 2011

It's summer again and chances are good you're working at top speed. Kids are out of school, so summer sports camps, team tours and rec programs are in full swing, as are everything from tennis tournaments to 5Ks to swim meets. It all adds up to a full schedule for planners. But in the midst of our crunch season, it's essential we remember how we got here, and what (or actually, who) keeps us here: the athletes. We love their ever-developing skill, their enthusiasm and their competitiveness. We love the way they've embraced their sports. And (need we say it?) we love the way they keep us busy.

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May/June 2011

As the economy ebbs and flows, everyone is looking for incontrovertible evidence that the recession is over. And while it hasn't really presented itself, the members of the hospitality and tourism industry all remain optimistic that the era of the 'stay-cation' (and haven't we all come to hate that term?) is over.

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March/April 2011

Our focus for the issue is on cycling, swimming and baseball, summer sports that campers and others will be enjoying during the warm months ahead. You can also learn a great deal from Chris Huot's insights into what to expect when working with CVBs (Convention and Visitor Bureaus) and Sports Commissions. Finally, we take an in-depth look at speedways, focusing on their unique attributes for hosting events, some of which might surprise you.

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January/February 2011

For many of us, sports play a dominant role in our lives. While we may have many other obligations, we still find time to make the game. Whether it's in the form of watching it on television, attending it in person, or actually participating in it, the sports-minded individual makes sacrifices in order to make it happen.

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2010

November/December 2010

With most organizations, the end of the year brings a brief time to reflect and review where the organization has been, and more importantly, where it's going. This is a great opportunity to evaluate what worked, what didn't, and how to do it better next year. In this issue of Sports Destination Management, we take that same approach and offer excellent insight into improving your events while looking at what works, the pitfalls to avoid, and how to stay on top.

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September/October 2010

Recently, I read an interesting article talking about the demise of softball at the international level due to its removal from the Olympics. Even in the U.S., funding for these top-level athletes has dwindled as the USOC no longer has the level of resources to dedicate to this sport. I find all this news a bit ironic, as softball participation in the U.S. is at an all-time high. Events surrounding this sport generate generous revenues to the rights-holders and the locations that host them. And yet, at the highest level, we cannot find the resources to keep these athletes in the sport.

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July/August 2010

Sometimes we don't see things that are right in front of us. Sometimes the most obvious is overlooked because we see it all the time. And the answer that we seek has been there all along. In this issue we focus on those things that we all know, but oftentimes fail to recognize.

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May/June 2010

Recently, a friend of mine made his first hole-in-one at a local golf course. Within minutes I received a tweet of the occurrence, followed immediately by an e-mail containing a photo of him holding the ball. A few hours later I received a Facebook notification with another proclamation of this accomplishment. And this was on a random Sunday morning. Imagine what the coverage would have been had he made that hole-in-one at a special event with cruises and cash on the line?

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March/April 2010

Whether it is a national competition or local event, every participant and attendee has an investment. While winning is usually the goal, everyone needs to leave the event with that sense of purpose and camaraderie that we glean from time together. That is one of the unique aspects of sport - at all levels.

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January/February 2010

Around here, the New Year brings forth a certain optimism where we all set out our objectives and slowly begin the process of perusing them. While these goals may vary in substance and importance, be they professional or personal, they all share one common trait - a timeline. Included in this annual rite of passage is the planning that goes into accomplishing those goals, specific with action plans.

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2009

November/December 2009

On October 2nd I received an e-mail alert notifying me that Chicago had been officially eliminated as a contender for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. Shortly thereafter I learned that Tokyo, then Madrid had been removed as well, leaving Rio as the ultimate choice. Agree or disagree, the reverberations around the globe were immense.

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September/October 2009

Sports as a Cause There is an old saying that things and events happen in threes. Be they births, deaths or other random events, the theory is that if one happens it will be followed by two more. I don't necessarily subscribe to this theory of threes, but I have noticed that events in my life tend to happen in bunches - so much so, that I find it hard to write-off as coincidence. Such is the case with the development of this issue.

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