Sports Destination Management Magazine | Sports Destination Management

Sports Destination Management Magazine

2014

March/April 2014

Sometimes, when we’re surrounded by top-notch sports complexes, we forget that many kids get their first introduction to sports – and the great outdoors in general – at their local parks. The facilities are free and they’re a great place for kids to unplug from the computer and connect with their friends. This issue gives us a great look at some fascinating facilities and in fact, some are based in city-owned and operated parks. We have a wealth of information in this issue, including articles on insurance, hotel selection, medical support at sports events, and how to effectively plan an event for athletes with mobility limitations. Don’t miss our feature on the mountain region of the U.S. either – it’s a lot more than skiing and hiking destinations. We’ll look at baseball facilities around the U.S. and get some insights into what goes into a successful swimming and diving event. We’ll also find out what is going on in the golf industry – as the Summer Olympics creep ever closer, what is this sport doing to bring in new players and rejuvenate its image? In addition, there are great features on various destinations and businesses. It’s all inside these pages, so enjoy – and learn.

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January/February 2014

The post-holiday winter doldrums might not get people fired up about sports – until you think about how much is waiting for us. As the Olympics in Sochi take over our TVs, America will be enjoying anything and everything taking place on ice and snow.

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2013

November/December 2013

Sports requires great athleticism but it also demands unparalleled strategy. Whether athletes are on the field, in the pool, in the ring or on the court, whether they’re with a team, with a partner or all alone, they need a game plan in order to win.

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September/October 2013

Athletes are, by nature, creatures of habit. We like to work out certain ways, at certain times, in certain places. We have pre-competition routines we like to follow in order to reach what we feel will be the best possible outcome. And we like to play in the same locations, in and on facilities where we feel comfortable.

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July/August 2013

In browsing photos for use with an article in this issue, I came across a series of shots taken at a boxing match. One athlete was getting pounded mercilessly by his opponent but each shot showed him fighting his way upright and charging back toward the center of the ring. It was an action that in every way, mirrors our experiences...

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May/June 2013

“Be prepared to overcome obstacles.” It’s probably the best advice I ever got, and it came from a race director who was in favor of advance planning, since as he said, things will always happen on race day, and the more you’ve done in advance, the better off you’ll be.

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March/April 2013

There's not a lot of news that comes out about the sports tourism industry that makes me upset. At this point, however, I'm really upset about what I see as a boneheaded move on the part of the IOC. The omission of wrestling from future Olympics is, as far as I'm concerned, one of the most boneheaded moves I have ever seen. Not that I like to point fingers or anything.

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January/February 2013

We're starting a new year, and health clubs are filling up with what has become known as 'the resolution crowd.' A lot of resolutions have to do with people making a commitment to a new and healthful trend in their lives. And when it comes right down to it, the landscape of sports is all about keeping tabs on emerging trends. In fact, we've dedicated this issue of Sports Destination Management to what we see as some of those important changes.

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2012

November/December 2012

Often, the things that it takes to put on a successful event are not just the things we see: the athletes, the spectators and the facilities. Sometimes, it goes beyond that. In this issue, we'll examine several things that might be largely invisible -- yet totally essential. The first is the value of a sports event to a community. We can talk about economic impact, but there's more to it than that. There's the civic pride, the morale boost that comes from a successful event and the ancillary benefit of spectators who become volunteers, and volunteers who become athletes.

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September/October 2012

Planning a sports event -- of any type -- demands a number of skills outside of an understanding of our chosen sport. We need to understand negotiations, budgeting, logistics and the intricacies of travel arrangements -- and that's just for starters. One of the great things about this industry the body of knowledge that surrounds us in the presence of our colleagues.

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July/August 2012

Athletes, in addition to being spokespersons, celebrities and more, have the sometimes difficult job of being role models. It's not always easy, but it can pay dividends by helping to instill good values in the generation coming up through the ranks. This month’s issue contains a great article on “Engaging the Community in Sports Events,” and I’m pleased to see an emphasis on the positive interaction between athletes and communities. Since our athletes may also be traveling abroad and competing in other countries at some point, it’s essential they be good role models there as well. The article on passports and visas can help organizations have the right paperwork ready when travel time comes.

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May/June 2012

This summer's Olympic Games in London will put a spotlight on the very best the sporting world has to offer. Athletes might win gold medals and glory, but for our industry, it translates into something a lot more valuable and lasting: increased participation. There is a positive correlation between extensive media coverage of the Olympics and people showing an interest in being more active and taking an interest in a given sport that year or the next. I'm pleased to see the insights this issue gives us into some of the sports the Olympics will offer.

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March/April 2012

As more and more individuals with mobility limitations take advantage of the recreation options available to them, the need to keep to have open, accessible events will keep on growing. Making your event not just friendly but downright welcoming to athletes and spectators with mobility limitations can mean an athlete not only returns next time, but brings family and friends. This issue's feature will provide some inside information from an industry expert who knows how to make that happen.

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January/February 2012

As the business of sports continues to evolve, sports themselves do as well. In this issue, we take a look at what is needed to provide great facilities for athletes with developmental challenges. Hint: It goes a lot deeper than just following ADA rules, and it applies to your event, no matter whether you're working with traditional competitive athletics or performance sports (like gymnastics or cheerleading).

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2011

November/December 2011

I'm a statistics geek. Give me some numbers and percentages and I'm all over it. And as the editor of a magazine that focuses on sports travel, it's even more fascinating when those numbers apply to your subject matter. That's why I was especially glad to see hard evidence that more kids than ever are playing high school sports. The best news of all? It's a trend that has been going strong for two decades now.

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September/October 2011

Everyone has a horror story. I'm not talking about the kind with the zombies and vampires. I'm talking about the kind that event planners, CVBs and others have dealt with. We all have them, and I'm guessing you've had one too. Maybe yours is about a pipe that burst and flooded the facility that was going to host your basketball tournament. Maybe it's about a school-system-wide flu epidemic that left you with a lot fewer athletes than you were counting on for your tournament. Maybe a big weather event closed the airport and left you unable to get to your tournament -- or maybe it's something else entirely that came out of left field and disrupted your well-laid plans.

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July/August 2011

It's summer again and chances are good you're working at top speed. Kids are out of school, so summer sports camps, team tours and rec programs are in full swing, as are everything from tennis tournaments to 5Ks to swim meets. It all adds up to a full schedule for planners. But in the midst of our crunch season, it's essential we remember how we got here, and what (or actually, who) keeps us here: the athletes. We love their ever-developing skill, their enthusiasm and their competitiveness. We love the way they've embraced their sports. And (need we say it?) we love the way they keep us busy.

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May/June 2011

As the economy ebbs and flows, everyone is looking for incontrovertible evidence that the recession is over. And while it hasn't really presented itself, the members of the hospitality and tourism industry all remain optimistic that the era of the 'stay-cation' (and haven't we all come to hate that term?) is over.

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March/April 2011

Our focus for the issue is on cycling, swimming and baseball, summer sports that campers and others will be enjoying during the warm months ahead. You can also learn a great deal from Chris Huot's insights into what to expect when working with CVBs (Convention and Visitor Bureaus) and Sports Commissions. Finally, we take an in-depth look at speedways, focusing on their unique attributes for hosting events, some of which might surprise you.

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January/February 2011

For many of us, sports play a dominant role in our lives. While we may have many other obligations, we still find time to make the game. Whether it's in the form of watching it on television, attending it in person, or actually participating in it, the sports-minded individual makes sacrifices in order to make it happen.

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